JOURNAL

By christinaillenapeake, Nov 18 2018 08:44AM

I was so nervous about giving this talk. Sharing the initimacy of my practice meaning the intimacies of my experiences and vulerabilities. This talk specifically was about an idea that I first discussed at the Laydeez Do Comics festival earlier in the year at a review session with Wallis Eates. She was amazing and most importantly encouraging that the idea I had presenteed for the 'Deep Deep Light Blue' of 'DDLB' actually had some weight to it. Because it has to have weight otherwise it doesn't merit the amount of hours when you could be sleeping, chilling or spending time with the family. And she confirmed what I suspected that it did.


In the presentation I outlined my idea and the projects that have come to inform this fiction in my head and I think it well. I recorded the session. As I recorded every practice of the presentation that came before. I am going to put it on the website but you know what the strangest thing was from practicing and feeling like this was the stupidest thing to do as I was unable to articulate myself, to now wanting triple the time of 20 minutesto do it all again but this time go deeper. Deeper into everything. Fieldwork as critical part of practice, observation, the politics and terms of engagement, artist as commuicator, art and ecology and/or creative ecology, research, intervention,commitment and the evolution of practice. Everything. I want to talk about everything that has been in my head and I am stating to wonder if maybe people might beinterested as they seemed to be that night.


I had an idea to start a series of podcasts talking with different people and basically what I did for the presentation and like DDLB I think their is weight in it. The 'Cahj & Collected' series, casual ideas intelligently articulated and interrogated. Maybe there's alot of weight in that?!

By christinaillenapeake, Oct 22 2018 06:12PM

I have been attending the free crit sessions provided by Turf Projects when I can the last few months. Whenever I do attend the level of professionalism and the quality of the work shown just makes me want to smile. It takes balls to present your work and more balls to hear the critiscism. I hate attending crits but I love to hear how artists' think and what they are thinking about. Its work in progress most of the time and its rare to see that private time. I value seeing that private time and aspiration for the final work.


There is usually a workshop to follow and these cover every aspect of the practical workings of being an artist like public speaking to the workshop I attended on the weekend on, 'How to get an exhibition' based on a text provided by the White Pube founders who led the crit and the workshop that day. I took a pic of my notes. I have that private blush on listening to their guidance and/or criticism where I think, that could be better, I'm doing that, okay forgot about that??! Basically trying to always perfect what you do but at the same time these are usually the aspects that I find the most difficult and find the hardest to learn and adapt to how I need to use them. I am not the best at social media as I prefer one to one with people. Life is so hectic working part time, having an art practice and then looking after your family and trying to, you know, just sleep. Jesus sleep is so good when done right! I literally loose years on my face that to sit and go throughSM accounts is the last thing I want to do. I wanna just chill with something funny, have a cuddle and kiss and relax with my family or some thriller stuff that I loose myself in.


It was a thrill this Saturday to participate though and I sincerely thank the people that made that possible at Turf and the White Pube free of charge no less. I really appreciate your time. See you next time.

By christinaillenapeake, Oct 18 2018 03:46PM

I loved Frieze Masters! For my practice being able to see so many pieces from cultures all over the world to ancient civilisations had my head spinning with ideas and fascination. I think the aspect that fascinates me the most is how contemporary these pieces look. Yes they maybe museum quality pieces but the aesthetic quality of them I find astonishing. There were Egyptian vases and bowls and I wondered for the life of me how it is possible to carve these pieces out of slabs of rock. The technology and dedication to their respective cultures and in many cases aspects of devotion are beyond remarkable. There were quite alot of war clubs that I saw. I remember looking at these things thinking 1. they are beautiful but 2. how many heads have been bashed in by these things? If tested would you find blood residue? There was a throwing club that I assume was lobbed through the air to take you out. Jesus that thing was solid. And that was your coller bone or hip gone!


I uploaded images of the Peruvian stand that had amazing tunics and textiles that they exhibited beautifully as artworks in their own right. Indian miniatures and the Haitain artworks from the Gallery of Everything that I still need to see the rest of the work at their gallery in Marlybone. Haiti is a country I would love to visit and run a project there. The history is remarkable. The only successful slave rebellion in history took plae their that was a key work by C. L. R. James, prolific Caribbean writer, titled 'The Black Jacobins' (1938) who wrote Beyond a Boundary (1963) another on the reading list. I mean every European superpower of the age tried to jump that tiny island but they said non in no uncertain terms.


I also visited the 1:54 Contemporary African Art Fair at Somerset House. I was knackered by that point but again alot of really interesting pieces. There was this set of paintings that looked like cave paintings and the artist had used natural pigments. I have reading quite alot about cave paintings and the conversation surrounding their production and the consumption of psychedelics and it is a fascinating read. The more I read about these drugs and their effects especially the treatments of mental illnesses such as PTSD is heartwarming from my point. I've had PTSD and it took a long time to recover from it, over a year in fact as I dealt with the trauma through counselling.


I usually can feel quite intimidated when going to galleries and seeing work as I want to be as strong as the work that bowls me over in the space but I came away this year just buzzing with ideas and proud that this is my profession and thinking where do you want to go next Mama?


By christinaillenapeake, Sep 27 2018 04:01PM

Porthminster Beach
Porthminster Beach
Portminster Beach
Portminster Beach
Seaweed in the shallows
Seaweed in the shallows
Porthgwidden beach (Tiny bay)
Porthgwidden beach (Tiny bay)
Portmeor beach at sunset
Portmeor beach at sunset
Some beautiful galleries particulary paintings, print and ceramics
Some beautiful galleries particulary paintings, print and ceramics
Ceramics
Ceramics
Pair of Igbo statues
Pair of Igbo statues
Benin bronzes
Benin bronzes
Sufer dudes
Sufer dudes
Blissed out from paddle boarding
Blissed out from paddle boarding

I have been to St. Ives twice this summer. The first time the weather was beautiful. The second not so much but I fell in love with the place. I hadn't visited since I was a teenager and stayed at the castle. Found a lovely lady to stay with who makes the place feel like home from home. Seafood was amazing. think this has become the bolt hole now when we need to get away.


Lots of art and beautiful things but loved the beaches and paddle boarding everyday. I am not a surfer but seeing the kids on a Saturday morning flipped the heart. Just visit on a good day though. The weather's hard when hellish as it always is by the coast.

By christinaillenapeake, Jul 31 2018 01:46PM

This month saw the end of my residency at the Women at the Well charity. The blanket below was the final outcome of the WATW Suffragette blanket project. The ladies came up with the project idea to replicate the blanket created at Holloway prison by the suffragettes for the WATW charity. We created fabric squares and then each square was decorated in whatever manner the participant chose. We also added embroidery created by the Sisters that support the work there then sew the squares together by hand and then wadding added to give quilted quality. The blanket is to be exhibited as wall hanging.


I have also added a couple more images from my visual diary. Working at WATW was a challenging and rewarding experience and their were many lessons that I learnt along the way from safeguarding to designing projects that are both low and high engagement impact with the audience so that you can adapt the work depending on the individual.


It also amazes me the amount of time people are able to donate to volunteer to support projects. Over the years I have volunteered on a number of projects from converting an old steam boat into a gallery and education space to supporting building homes or reclaiming urban spaces. Living in London there are so many projects to choose from if you are interested and if my commitments had been different at the moment I would have liked to continue to support WATW but I will definately stay in touch and look forward the Volunteers' Summer Party in a couple months.


Over the next few months I will now be creating a series of four artworks born out of the experience and running projects with the charity and practice research. The series will take the form of reimaging a set of four gold weights (or sculptures in this instance) that were used to measure gold dust in the historic African kingdoms as a form of currency. These gold weights dependent on the culture could be devices to balance mental health to respositorites for the ancesters who could then guide negotiations in favour of the family. The statues' forms would range from animals, to folklore, popular characters or senior figures in society and could fit in the hand. Passed down from generation to generation they were talismans for the individual and and family. I hope this set will reflect and elevate the community I have come to know over the last year.


Stomach pump
Stomach pump
Sepsis
Sepsis
Self Portrait - Exhausted
Self Portrait - Exhausted