JOURNAL

By christinaillenapeake, Jan 14 2020 01:33PM

Left to right: Obrist, Okri, Natarajan, Kiefer, Siren, Bello, du Sautoy.
Left to right: Obrist, Okri, Natarajan, Kiefer, Siren, Bello, du Sautoy.
Du Sautoy on the boundary of the obervable universe.
Du Sautoy on the boundary of the obervable universe.
Du Sautoy on the many worlds theory.
Du Sautoy on the many worlds theory.
Model of quantum physic functions during photosynthesis.
Model of quantum physic functions during photosynthesis.
'Die Lebenden und dis Toten', 2019
'Die Lebenden und dis Toten', 2019
'Raum - Zeit', 2019
'Raum - Zeit', 2019
Vainamoinen sucht die drei fehlende Buchstaben', 2018-19
Vainamoinen sucht die drei fehlende Buchstaben', 2018-19
Detail of above.
Detail of above.

It is rare I think that you have this type of event, with contributors at this level and no one disappointed. It was fascinating, as always, to see the work that people are doing but the headline for me was that we see the same motifs or concepts coming through again and again but also inherent within so many beliefs systems and that is order and chaos. Two of the professors presenting on the day described how reaching the point of chaos which in many instances is the highest point of potential, is where you find novelty and the breakthrough/s. Another professor, Alexandra Olaya shared models of quantum physics functions in photosynthesis (I hope I noted that correctly) and the headline for that was that this function was not a fight but reflected a symbiotic relationship and that functional serenity was fascinating, as my reading of that is that serenity is achieved when you have a perfect balance of chaos and order.


From the discussion of mythology, runes and the Gordian knot, what I saw was the reemergence and development of new and ancient languages of the mystical and magical. The panel spoke of the mysticism of physics especially when speaking hundreds of hypotheses that can't be proven at this point. It was also fascinating to consider what we don’t know, and may never know.


Anselm though he may never know it made me feel great and that's not because he was bloody funny with a quick smile but because when he spoke of his work, of it never being finished and his practice in general would never reach an ultimate point of realisation or accomplishment but that in itself was exciting because truly who wants to reach that point. There is nothing left to discuss or challenge yourself with at that point. How many things scare him but that means it worth doing and the freedom artists’ have to experiment and mutate philosophical concepts. Another point I resonanted with was that you can never see the entire story due to the number of layers within the work.


He did make a fascinating point about cosmologies, that they give artists’ multiple ways of interpreting the world. I think in general the point to take home from the Head of Arts at CERN to the physics and maths professor and artist present was the ecology of interdisciplinary practice from subject matter to the need for research and ideas to step out of the siloed expert fields that they stand in. There were so many scientific, cosmological, mystical and mythical concepts that converged in Anselm’s paintings and the time it takes to allow that breath of research to sink in the brain to enable any kind of synergy. That is exactly how I feel about my research. There is a gap for me between research and creation of actual work where the concepts have to be intellectually and physically absorbed to the point where when I then create a work, the content frees itself almost carelessly because the concepts have wedded themselves to practice so completely,


I love an event where you want to run from the gallery blinded by the galaxy of ideas in your head, straight into the studio. God knows how big Anselm’s studio is?! I imagine a phalanx of aircraft hangars where he needs WW2 bomber planes to fly from one end to the other. Do you dude! Do you!




By christinaillenapeake, Nov 29 2019 07:21AM

I look at Gorine and I see so many similarities in her story of the female immigrant but we diverge greatly through race, privilege and subject. The sculptures of Asian men and women interest me in what would their stories be two generations down the line and link maintained to home? Whereas Gordine focused on the form and movement of the subject finding uniques silhouettes in her travels to Asia, I am interested in the narrative of her subjects' underrepresented stories and their relationship to the natural environment.


My mother immigrated from Barbados in 1971 to the UK to marry my father, a white Englishman who grew up in Sussex but had lived in Singapore as a child and conducted business their through his car export company. My father would bring home plastic models of Malaysian dancers from work trips or my grandmother’s shadow carvings and handmade kimonos who hang for decades in the wardrobe. Gordine’s actions to mitigate her Jewish ancestry by changing her name but accentuating her exoticism through dress and manner whose actions I could identify with being of mixed heritage the exoticism was inherent with your physical looks but there was no capacity to mitigate one’s skin colour. The Icon collection in the museum fascinated me as again the similarity with the Caribbean and the integration of Christianity within society which reflects a deep cultural impact to the individual and their identity. My mother would note that connection, not through religious artifact but only through practicing christianity in the Barbados as she thought the British people didn’t understand worship as they expressed no joy in it. The Russian Icons are a sumptuous illustration of the divine which infer a supranatural family in the holy trinity but this is also the divine aspect of nature itself, therefore when looking at them again I found myself looking out the window at nature itself.


This house is a magnet for light a necessity for the artist but what I felt was also the embrace of nature through every window, looking directly into Richmond Park. When I designed and built my studio which is a tiny thing I added as much window space as possible and in the garden where it is situated has Jasmine tapping on the door every summer. I looked into Richmond Park and members of the public walking through it and the high walled gardens that reminded of the book 'A Secret Garden' that I read as a child and it occured to me that there is the opportunity here for contained experimentation within this unique museum environment, incorporating internal and external spaces. There are predictions that with the onset of climate change, nature is already evolving and creating new forms within itself, incorporating waste for example, into new survival strategies, so what could these new strategies look like if we take waste materials, the forms of the body and face as Gordine typified and nature? Gordine assilmilated into a new culture and created a new modernity within it so what could I create if given the opportunity? Incorporating my mixed heritage in querying the translocality and contemporaneity of climate change affecting Britain and Barbados (which is listed as one of the top 20 countries at critical threat from rising sea levels) and the artist's response.


To work with a museum, which growing up were the places that held the cultural artefacts of the communities that you grew up with in London, from Africa, South America to Asia, essentially the ethnic minorities presented through ethnographic and anthropological representation but rarely as the one creating, telling or presenting these narratives within the institutions although this is definitely starrting to change as I remember Frank Bowling and Kara Walker at the Tate Briatin and Modern or Elvira Dyangani Ose, Director of The Showroom gallery. To secure a residency in a museum like this, in the home of one of Britain's celebrated female sculptors would be the realisation of an aspiration that I have held for years, that I never though could be realised but I was worked consistently towards through design and delivering projects and collaborating with charities and cultural orgnisations evolving my practice with every challenge.


The VLOG page has 6 videos from the Student Climate Strike and Extinction Revolution protests held this year, footage from the coral reefs in Paynes Bay, Barbados in January, film of the Veridor green landfill incinerator seen from my home, plus experimenting with film journal in 'CAHJ & COLLECTED #12 and #13' for the protogonist called 'The Sacred Ecologist' holding what could be one day 'The last piece of the Amazon' reflecting a visit to Dorich House, creative practice, mental health and the mercurial nature of the future to come, that would inform the narrative for the next phase of practice work.


Gordine's studio
Gordine's studio
Gordine's studio
Gordine's studio
The Chinese Philosopher, 1925-6
The Chinese Philosopher, 1925-6
Work inspired through travels in Asia.
Work inspired through travels in Asia.
Russian Icon collection
Russian Icon collection
Russian Icon collection
Russian Icon collection
Russian Icon collection
Russian Icon collection
Natures new strategies for using waste to its advantage - Happy Meal toy
Natures new strategies for using waste to its advantage - Happy Meal toy
Discarded pushchair as new foundation for marine life.
Discarded pushchair as new foundation for marine life.
The last piece of the Amazon.
The last piece of the Amazon.

By christinaillenapeake, Sep 23 2019 09:38AM

Walking through Westminster on Friday I was amazed by not only the passion but the humour of the politicial voice being excercised by the children and young people in attendance. Plus the amount of adults that attended to support the students protesting. Some of the slogans I thought had to have had a helping hand from a parent or some kind of adult but either way to see young people and so many children excercising their right to peaceful process was remarkable.


I didn't bring my son with me as I thought when he can understand whats going on I would want for him to choose to excercise his political agency rather than me making the decision for him, however, no judgement for those that did bring the little ones. I went as I still wanted to support their protest and it was an inspirational day.


One of things that did concern me though and I thought the same when I checked out the Extinct Revolution protests in London earlier this year, was that there was little to no presentation of indigenous people or alternative narratives from First Nations, people of colour and so on. They are so key to the narrative but it's like their story gets annexed or not included at all when it comes to the climate change narrative. However I was astonished by the coordination of the multiple strikes aroundthe world but I still wonder how many children, students, young people were represented from this communites in those strikes or general in relation to the indigneous communities in those countries?


I spoke to some women who were respresenting Survival International and they had noted the same. They mentioned another organisation called 'Wretched of the Earth' that also present alternative narratives but I couldn't find them as the day progressed. We discussed in general how many times the story around climate change could be read as another neo-colonial action whereby the West through foreign policy and environmental movements were dictating to other countries and their people such as Brazil how to act, yet the indigenous people at the heart of this had their voices supressed and/or were rarely invited to contribute.


This is not the first time that I have heard this type of criticism leveled at environmental movements riding high on the righteous indignation which understandable when you take a moment to absorb what is happening but argueably dictating what should happen rather than asking those living in these environments that are directly effected for their input. There is also the fact that Britain has had its industrial revolution. One where with little regulation we as a nation had pumped God knows how many tonnes of pollution, over what 150 years, into the world's seas, atmosphere and land, extracted obscene amounts of resources through colonial expansion and now we have come out of that we then seek to dictate others what they are to do. There is a hypocrisy and failure to take accountability for what we have contributed to for the last few centuries to this climate change crisis. Our colonial history has contributed to the environmental narrative as well as all the other European coutries as we explored and colonised the world.


Everyone is contributing to this and so while I applaud the young for protesting for what they believe in, we all have a hand in that and many indigenous communities have a long history of living sustainably with their environment. There is so much knowledge in these communities as well as nature that we have yet to learn.


I think this is defintiely where my research and practice is gong next, to find the myriad of stories that aren't making the headline but are at the heart of the struggle for survival.

By christinaillenapeake, Sep 19 2019 01:32PM

'COSMONAUT' exhibition poster
'COSMONAUT' exhibition poster
Deptford Does Art Gallery
Deptford Does Art Gallery
Deptford Does Art Gallery
Deptford Does Art Gallery
Deptford Does Art Gallery
Deptford Does Art Gallery
Deptford Does Art Gallery - WATW sculptures
Deptford Does Art Gallery - WATW sculptures
'Dream Home', 2019
'Dream Home', 2019
'Call of the Wild', 2019
'Call of the Wild', 2019
'Who bound GG (Gorgeous Girl)?', 2019
'Who bound GG (Gorgeous Girl)?', 2019
'Gimme the Keys Pete... Slooowly!', 2019
'Gimme the Keys Pete... Slooowly!', 2019
'Moloka', 2019
'Moloka', 2019
'Amazonas VIII', 2019
'Amazonas VIII', 2019
'Amazonas VII', 2019
'Amazonas VII', 2019
'Plastic Fantastic', 2019
'Plastic Fantastic', 2019
'Rainforest I', 2019
'Rainforest I', 2019
'The Malarai in the Time of Man', 2019
'The Malarai in the Time of Man', 2019
'See it. Kill it. II', 2019
'See it. Kill it. II', 2019
'Banana Tree', 2019
'Banana Tree', 2019
'Raging Gods', 2019
'Raging Gods', 2019

This was my first solo show and I don't think I have ever been so anxious to show work in my life. You never really hear about childcare or considertion of its provision for the artist in the creative industries but without my family for support I don't know how I would of done it plus the support of friends, again, whose support and encouragement was infectious so didn't completely crap it when the private view came along.


To see all the work up that had only previous occupied the studio and my laptop brought the biggest smile to my face. I was so proud of myself and the gallery was incredibly supportive. A couple who intensively invest and care about the arts community in their area. They have lots of amazing pieces from fashion to jewellery to buy so if you find yourself in Deptford check them out. Also there are some amazing African fabric shops that I have to go back and visit.


There are plans for the sculptures to shown at WATW so that the women can see them and I hope thats the case as they really were inspirational although I have to admit that it was one of the hardest projects I have ever taken on.


Wierd that I worked close to makng myself ill but now I want to plan a second one but first have to find the projects to inform the next show. Another lesson I learned that the field work is everything and the stories are authentic because they were lived. Thats seems obvious but the memories of people and places constantly run through my head selecting each motif and colour as I create the work. I thought especially when making the sculptures. I can wait to make another set of those or paintings again.


Heres to the next adventure or quest. Next year its time to travel again and I. Can't. Wait!



By christinaillenapeake, May 13 2019 12:35PM

I first learnt about the Extinction Revolution when the protests caused me to be three hours late for work. At first I was pissed but as I walkED on a beautiful day I took my phone out to photograph what was happening around me. Marble Arch had tents all over and an elephant with ecocide written across its back, Oxford Circus had a bright pink boat and Waterloo Bridge was more like a festival with both police and protesters being equally respectful of each other but obviously frustrated via quiet conflict of the situation.


The police force has been reduced by 20,000 officers and knife crime has seen a frightening growth, not that it isn't always present. This mayn't be gun country but most, if it is felt that its needed will hold something for protection and/or offence. I spoke with one of the police officer's and asked how she felt about it and the answer was the one I expected, that she would rather spend her time dealing with crime that put the lives of others at risk. I had to agree that I thought it was a waste of resources especially when you considered this was shortly after the murder in Clapham of a father of three children, killed at a traffic light in broad daylight. I appreciate the protestors were breaking the law. I mean you wouldn't need to protest or organise intervention in this manner nor would you create the same amount of publicity if there wasn't contention with the law.


I have been to a few protests over the years but I have to admit this was the most peaceful and respectful demonstration I have been too with plenty of vegan food in shopping trollies for those supporting. And that's what I found, that a number of the volunteers that I spoke to had joined when the protests started so I failed to find someone that could answer my questions, such as, I wanted to understand the concept of the 'citizen assembly' and how that would be taken for with government buy in or not, how the intentions of the protest would continue beyond the site specific intervention but I found it very difficult to get beyond the surface to the long-term vision of this movement.


I agree with many of the ideas but I don't know whether this was the best way of doing it? The reason being that for those already converted church is a given and for this protest many people are already like minded and thus join the cause and who doesn't want to be allied with environmental concern and sensitivity for the future. However my understanding is that this is a universal world issue and one as a nation that you will require collective solidarity of the public to work, so that everyone can take on their responsibility in addition to the government. I absolutely agree that the government as the governing body of our nation state has and should lead the way when it comes to environmental action however I wonder how effective it is to alienate sections of the public to protest against government inaction when this is a global societal issue. Those that don't agree with protest seemed more alienated. The points put forward by protestors (and I appreciate this is a small section that I met at the stands) couldn't really speak deeply about the issue and the key principles of the movement separate to what was printed on flyers and posters so I took as much contact information as I could so I can try and make further attempts to learn more about how this is to be taken forward. I wonder how many were protesting for protesting sake?


In contrast to the criticism, I do admire the amount of organisation that had gone into it and motivating people to turn up and make it happen. Although I didn't find the depth in the politics and thats hard when people are turning up and helping out on the spot and they were honest about what they didn't know and I value that deeply. I appreciated that they were exceptionally clear about the potential to be arrested and to consider what that means for you and your future. There was a maturity and responsibility taken with the call for action which is very seductive but they emphasied care should be taken when protesting. Workshops were run on a variety of subjects such non-violent protest. I even saw a stand where you could block print your own t-shirts and I loved the artwork that I saw for the posters and different places like on Waterloo Bridge. These people care deeply about the issues affecting our planet and I whole heartedly applaud that and agree.


For me I need to understand the core political points of the movement and the vision for it. Its not enough for me as one protestor said that its about the 'environment' and finished with that as a statement. I want to see the same environmental issues addressed but with practical and coherent answers that outline how that will be taken forth in line with research that is coming out with those at the vanguard of how to make that happen.


To me whether the government buys in or not, how as a movement of people can you take forward the actions that you want anyway? How can you change the things within your life to effect change as a million of your decisions collectively makes a difference? In addition to the government's responsibility to manage these issues on a national scale. This is the collective and the individual. I see the Extinction Rebellion standing in the middle of that reciprocity with the potential to do great work as many movements, organisations are doing already, moving toward instigating our government to do more but so far my first impression didn't provide me with a depth of how it is to survive, whether it is just a singular call to arms or one with a clear vision of how to push forward as you'll never win with the former and there is too much riding on need for change to fail. Therefore I intend to follow up on what was given to me and see what more I can learn. A first impression is just that. I want to see what happens when the honeymoon is over and the work begins because that is what I am up for.